ATS, Tucson: Do As We Say, Not As We Do

As a follow up to this report about the mobile speed van signs being illegal because they don’t meet MUTCD standards, on the local level companies like ATS are ignoring relevant laws as well.

According to the Arizona Daily Star, Tucson has city ordinances regarding signs that ATS refuses to follow. They use small A-Frame signs to notify drivers of the presence of speed cameras. These signs NOT resemble traffic-control signs, but rather signs you’d see that advertise a local business or an open house.
Local Realtors and business owners are familiar with the sign ordinances that prohibit placing such signs on in the public easement without a permit and require that such signs be 6 feet away from the curb.

The purpose of the ordinance is allegedly for safety. So one has to wonder why it’s OK for a speed van sign to be placed in the public right-of-way in an unsafe manner. It is clear that ATS and the city are prime examples of the hypocrisy, “do what we say, and not what we do.”

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One Comment

  1. Fred Sboddi
    Posted August 31, 2012 at 8:45 pm | Permalink

    Section 2A.18 Mounting Height

    Standard:
    01 The provisions of this Section shall apply unless specifically stated otherwise for a particular sign or object marker elsewhere in this Manual.

    Support:
    02 The mounting height requirements for object markers are provided in Chapter 2C.

    03 In addition to the provisions of this Section, information affecting the minimum mounting height of signs as a function of crash performance can be
    found in AASHTO’s “Roadside Design Guide” (see Section 1A.11).

    Standard:
    04 The minimum height, measured vertically from the bottom of the sign to the elevation of the near edge of the pavement, of signs installed at the side
    of the road in rural areas shall be 5 feet (see Figure 2A-2).

    05 The minimum height, measured vertically from the bottom of the sign to the top of the curb, or in the absence of curb, measured vertically from the
    bottom of the sign to the elevation of the near edge of the traveled way, of signs installed at the side of the road in business, commercial, or residential
    areas where parking or pedestrian movements are likely to occur, or where the view of the sign might be obstructed, shall be 7 feet (see Figure 2A-2).

    Option:
    06 The height to the bottom of a secondary sign mounted below another sign may be 1 foot less than the height specified in Paragraphs 4 and 5.

    Standard:
    07 The minimum height, measured vertically from the bottom of the sign to the sidewalk, of signs installed above sidewalks shall be 7 feet.

    08 If the bottom of a secondary sign that is mounted below another sign is mounted lower than 7 feet above a pedestrian sidewalk or pathway
    (see Section 6D.02), the secondary sign shall not project more than 4 inches into the pedestrian facility.

    Traffic Laws
    Photo Enforced R10-18 2B.55 36 x 24 36 x 24 48 x 30 54 x 36 — 54 x 36
    Photo Enforced (symbol plaque) R10-19P 2B.55 24 x 12 24 x 12 36 x 18 48 x 24 — 48 x 24
    Photo Enforced (plaque) R10-19aP 2B.55 24 x 18 24 x 18 36 x 30 48 x 36 — 48 x 36

    Section 6F Temporary Signs

    Guidance:
    11 Except as provided in Paragraph 12, signs mounted on portable sign supports that do not meet the minimum mounting heights provided in Paragraphs 4
    through 6 should not be used for a duration of more than 3 days.

    Option:
    12 The R9-8 through R9-11a series, R11 series, W1-6 through W1-8 series, M4-10, E5-1, or other similar type signs (see Figures 6F-3, 6F-4, and 6F-5)
    may be used on portable sign supports that do not meet the minimum mounting heights provided in Paragraphs 4 through 6 for longer than 3 days.

    Support:
    13 Methods of mounting signs other than on posts are illustrated in Figure 6F-2.

    Section 6B.01 Fundamental Principles of Temporary Traffic Control

    Support:
    01 Construction, maintenance, utility, and incident zones can all benefit from TTC to compensate for the unexpected or unusual situations
    faced by road users. When planning for TTC in these zones, it can be assumed that it is appropriate for road users to exercise caution. Even
    though road users are assumed to be using caution, special care is still needed in applying TTC techniques.

    SPEED LIMIT

    How does the Town of Prescott Valley determine speed limits?

    The Town of Prescott Valley follows the guidelines set forth in the Arizona State Statutes and the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD)
    to set speed limits in our town. The State Statutes allow local authorities to determine speed limits on streets based on an “engineering and traffic
    investigation.” The MUTCD provides the criteria that are used for the engineering study. The MUTCD states that the speed limit should be within 5 mph
    of the 85th percentile speed of free flowing traffic (the speed at which 85% of the vehicles are traveling at or less than). It also allows consideration
    of road characteristics, roadside development, parking and pedestrian activity, and crash experience. Most of our studies are in areas where the roadside
    environment is changing due to development or where we have an inordinately high number of accidents. Studies may also be based on citizen requests.


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